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MindAbet Vision and Description

Thinking, Memory, Imagination, Consciousness…

Minds are defined by conscious experience and intelligent thought. Common attributes of mind include perception, reason, imagination, memory, emotion, attention, free-will and a capacity for communication.

We strive to develop all aspects of your Mind. We promise to go beyond Math and Logic development. We promise to bring Worlds of History, Science, Geography, Literature, Philosophy and Art to you to make your life so much more meaningful, interesting and excited.

People need news, so they have something to talk about with each other. News are easy, they are everywhere, many people work on delivering them to us. But our past is full of amazing and deeply meaningful stories that we can retell to our friends on appropriate occasions. Our promise is to deliver them to you.

Our programs are not just for kids. They are for everyone! Please enjoy!

 

Thinking

“I think, therefore I am”

René Descartes (1596-1650)

Thought is an activity of Mind which allows to make sense of things in the world. Thinking forms concepts, engage in problem solving, reasoning and making decisions. Thinking is deeply connected with our capacity to understand cause and effect; to recognize patterns; to comprehend and disclose unique contexts of experience or activity; and to respond to the world in a meaningful way.

 

Memory

“Memory is the mother of all wisdom”

Aeschylus (525BC-456BC)

Memory is the ability to preserve, retain, and recall, knowledge, information or experience.

 

Imagination or “Mind’s Eyes”

“I paint objects as I think them, not as I see them”

Pablo Picasso (1881–1973)

Imagination is the activity of generating situations, images, ideas in the mind. Among the many practical functions of imagination are the ability to project possible futures, to “see” things from another’s perspective, and to change the way something is perceived, including to make decisions to respond to, or enact, what is imagined.

 

Consciousness

“No problem can be solved from the same level of consciousness that created it”

Albert Einstein (1879–1955)

Consciousness in mind comprises the ability to perceive the relationship between oneself and one’s environment.

Recent Posts

Lesson 1: “Identifying Nouns”

This is a review lesson. Kids must be already familiar with the definition of noun.

Start the lesson with asking kids to write the title “Nouns” in their notebooks and explaining that today they are going to review what they already know about nouns.

I. Definition

Ask kids to recall what is a noun together. Make sure kids understand that a noun is a word and NOT an object itself.

Noun is a word that names a person, place, thing or idea.

Ask kids to write the definition down into their notebooks.

II. “Who?”

Ask kids to give you examples of words that name a person: girl, uncle, nurse. Then ask them to write down the following statement:

A noun can tell you "Who?"

While writing, kids will have time to think about the statement. After they are finished, ask them why is this statement true. (Who? A boy. Who? A clown.)

Challenge: Give kids two words: baby and boy. Ask them to determine if the words are nouns by using definition of a noun and the “Who?” question. (Both words name a person. Who? A baby. Who? A boy.) Now, build a phrase “baby boy”. Ask kids find nouns in the phrase. Based on definition, both words should be nouns. But if we try to see what questions do they answer, then Who? Boy. (noun) What kind of boy? Baby. (adjective)

Summary: We need both: the definition of a noun and the “Who?” question to identify a noun in a sentence.

III. “What?”

Ask kids to give you examples of words that name a place: school, gym, park.

Ask kids to give you examples of words that name a thing (anything you can see, hear, smell, taste or touch ): chair, cat, ice cream.

Ask kids to give you examples of words that name an idea (anything you cannot see, hear, smell, taste or touch): joy, bravery, liberty, peace.

Then ask them to write down the following statement:

A noun can tell you "What?"

While writing, kids will have time to think about the statement. After they are finished, ask them why is this statement true. (What? A table. What? Love.)

Challenge: Give kids two words: tree and branch. Ask them to determine if the words are nouns by using definition of a noun and the “What?” question. (Both words name a thing. What? A tree. What? A branch.) Now, build a phrase “tree branch”. Ask kids find nouns in the phrase. Based on definition, both words should be nouns. But if we try to see what questions do they answer, then What? Branch. (noun) What kind of branch? Tree. (adjective)

Summary: We need both: the definition of a noun and the “What?” question to identify a noun in a sentence.

IV. Exercise: “Sort Nouns”

Ask kids to make a table with 4 columns in their note books by dividing the page first into 2 columns, and then each column into 2 more columns.

Name the table Nouns; name each column as PersonPlaceThing and Idea.

Explain that you are going to read some words.  Kids need to sort and write the words under the correct column. After each word, stop and ask kids under what column they put the word and why.

Nouns

Person Place Thing Idea

Note: The words you want to use for the exercise depends on the kids level. It is helpful use words from their previous spelling tests to reinforce their memory.

Note: Include NOT nouns words and compound nouns in your list.

Sample word list: Chair, park, sing, friend, love, Maryblue, popcorn, time, club, officer, zone, freedom, read, north, zoo, president, Californiadog, talk, pencil, gym, sad, number, scout, pink, and weekend.

V. Exercise: “Sort Nouns II”

Continue filling out the table from the previous exercise. But now, use words in content by reading a story. As before, stop after each sentence and ask kids what words they found, what column they chose and why. At that time, you can even display the sentence on your board for visual learners.

Story: Emma and her mother went to the science center in the city. They wanted to see the Ancient Egypt exhibition. They looked around at all the artifacts on display. There were statues, jewelry, and coins. Everywhere they looked there were exotic items to see. 

VI. Summary.

Summarize the lesson’s points by asking kids what is the correct way to identify if a word is a noun. (By using the definition of a noun and the “Who?” or “What?” questions.)

VII. Homework.

Find and write nouns for each letter in the alphabet. Ask kids to be creative in their choice of words and surprise you.

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